Attacks on Regulatory Protections

REINS Act (Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act of 2017)

This bill would have significantly limited the ability of federal agencies to pass regulations that protect the environment and health. It would have required Congressional approval for any new rules, severely limiting the ability of agencies like EPA to do their job.

Read our letter to the Senate opposing this bill.

The pro-environment vote is NO.

H.R. 26 passed in the House on January 5, 2017, with a vote of 237-187.

S. 21 introduced in the Senate.

Midnight Rules Relief Act

This bill would have allowed Congress to pass multiple Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolutions at once, thereby throwing out dozens of important environmental, health, and other protections simultaneously without debate.

Read our letter to the Senate opposing this bill.

The pro-environment vote is NO.

H.R. 21 passed in the House on January 5, 2017, with a vote of 238-184

S. 34 introduced in the Senate.

Regulatory Accountability Act

The Regulatory Accountability Act would have dangerously slowed the process for issuing and enforcing rules to ensure we have clean air and water, safe food and consumer products, fair wages and safe workplaces, and many other key protections. The bill would have added dozens of burdensome new requirements to the Administrative Procedure Act — increasing the demands on agencies that are already struggling to operate under tight budgets.

The pro-environment vote is NO.

H.R. 5 passed the House on January 11, 2017 with a vote of 238-183

Regulatory Integrity Act

The Regulatory Integrity Act would have prohibited federal agencies from communicating with the public about proposed regulations. This bill would have stifled participation in the regulatory process and gave more power to influence regulations to special interests, like corporate polluters. This bill was bad for democracy as well as the environment and public health.

The pro-environment vote is NO.

H.R. 1004 passed the House on March 2, 2017 with a vote of 246-176

Searching for and Cutting Regulations that are Unnecessarily Burdensome (SCRUB) Act

The SCRUB Act would have established a commission to identify rules and regulations to be repealed. The commission would only consider costs, not benefits of regulations, rendering its decisions useless and not in the public interest. Additionally, the bill would have required agencies adopting new regulations to cut an existing rule with equal or greater cost.

The pro-environment vote is NO.

H.R. 998 passed the House on March 1, 2017 with a vote of 240-185